World

Mining sector to rely increasingly on renewables, report finds

As mining companies become more aware of the rapidly falling costs of renewables, wind and solar are set become a growing trend in powering mining operations worldwide over the coming years, shows a new report from Fitch Solutions. On the back of carbon pricing schemes, countries and companies operating in the Americas are best positioned to lead the way in the adoption of renewables in mining.

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Array Changing Technologies 2018: The winners

After plenty of deliberations from the jury of independent PV industry experts assembled by pv magazine, we are pleased to announce the top innovations selected in the Array Changing Technologies 2018.

Sony lays out plans to go 100% renewable by 2040

Japanese electronics giant, Sony has become the latest major organization to commit to a 100% renewable energy target for all of its operations. The company has joined the RE100, a global NGO initiative promoting renewable energy, and plans to reach its target by 2040.

Nuclear power is being left behind, industry experts say

The 2018 edition of the Nuclear Industry Status Report (WNISR) reveals that nuclear power capacity grew by only 1% in 2017, while wind and solar saw their share increase by 17% and 35%, respectively. The report also recognizes that solar and wind are now the cheapest grid-connected sources of energy. Investments in new nuclear plants, on the other hand, are only being driven by public support, and by nuclear weapon states.

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The weekend read: A new test for trackers

The benefits of deploying bifacial solar panels on single-axis trackers are touted like snake oil these days, with promises of anywhere from 5 to 50% gains in energy output compared with a monofacial panel. Unfortunately, the field data that might delineate the actual energy gain of a bifacial panel on a tracker are hard to acquire, and the data that are available typically describe small-scale tests under tightly defined conditions.

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Clean tech transition could generate 65 million jobs, save $26 trillion – study

The New Climate Economy and OVO Energy, together with the Imperial College London, have published two independent reports pointing at the tremendous financial advantages resulting from clean tech transitions. Carbon pricing schemes could reap global sales of around US$2.8 billion, they say. Wide-spread use of storage, V2G, and electric heating could further save U.K. homes around $258 per year.

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If you want peace, prepare for solar

Solar has the potential to foster peace and aid conflict resolution by being deployed in several of the world’s crisis areas. Electricity is one of the highest costs for humanitarian missions in fragile regions, such as South Sudan, the Congo, Somalia, Myanmar and Yemen, among others. In an interview with pv magazine, the CEO and founder of Energy Peace Partners describes how solar installed in camps and protected areas, could improve the outcomes of such missions.

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EnergyTrend expects price shuffle after EU ends MIP

According to the Taiwanese analysts, the solar PV module market is still stable. However, EnergyTrend expects a new price war to erupt with the end of minimum import tariffs (MIPs). In particular, Taiwanese manufacturers will have to cope with increasing price pressure.

US data suggests collapse of PV module imports in the wake of Section 201

Newly released EIA data shows overall module shipments falling by two thirds in the second quarter of 2018, while pre-tariff prices remained relatively steady.

Battery materials company Livent Corporation goes public

The lithium producer is banking on both its substantial history and new developments in the rapidly growing the electric vehicle market.

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