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electrolyte

Northvolt acquires lithium-metal battery start-up Cuberg

The technology developed by a business spun out of Stanford five years ago could deliver an electrolyte with energy density of more than 1 kWh/l.

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Lithium-sulfur solid-state batteries promise fire safety at high performance

The scramble for new battery solutions is accelerating as researchers from Singapore tout an electrolyte which which they say produces highly stable lithium-sulfur batteries that maintain performance metrics – a task which has proven tricky thus far.

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Narrowing down 166 billion battery materials

Researchers at the U.S. Argonne National Laboratory have applied a combination of machine learning and artificial intelligence to help narrow down a list of 166 billion molecules that could be used to form the basis of a battery electrolyte. The technique, say the researchers, offers a way to greatly reduce the cost of narrowing down such an enormous data set, while still providing a precise understanding of each molecule and its likely suitability.

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Calcium batteries cool down with new electrolyte

Scientists at Germany’s Karlsruhe Institute of Technology have developed a new class of electrolytes they say could bring calcium batteries – currently only a lab technology – a step closer to being a practical reality for energy storage.

‘New and strange properties’ provide a boost to energy storage

MIT scientists have developed a class of liquid electrolyte with properties they say could open up new possibilities for improving the performance and stability of lithium batteries and supercapacitors.

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Unlocking lithium metal’s stored potential

Several new concepts in lithium-ion storage technology have the potential to greatly the increase the energy capacity of batteries. Among them are lithium metal anodes, which could potentially increase energy density by more than 50%. With a newly optimized electrolyte, scientists at the University of California, San Diego have taken another step toward making the idea a commercial reality.

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Researching some cool new battery materials

Scientists from China and the United States have developed an additive for electrolyte materials they say could improve the operating temperature range for lithium-ion batteries, allowing them to operate down to minus 40 degrees Celsius without compromising performance at temperatures up to 60 degrees Celsius.

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