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Fridays for Future

Toshiba and Siemens Energy pledge to walk away from coal-fired power business

The Japanese tech giant and German power company have followed the lead of General Electric by promising not to take on any new coal power station contracts.

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EU Climate Law dubbed a ‘surrender’ by Thunberg and a ‘disappointment’ by trade bodies and politicians

European Parliament groupings, renewable energy associations and climate activists have voiced disappointment at the EU Climate Law officially unveiled yesterday. Lack of a raised emission-reduction ambition to 2030 is at the heart of the opposition, with critics saying the plan will be insufficient to help prevent global temperatures rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius.

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Germany lifts cap on solar FIT program with new Climate Change Act

While the solar industry will welcome the move, the feed-in tariff paid to small systems is still reducing thanks to the volume of new capacity installed every quarter. Announcing a wide-ranging policy package on Friday, Angela Merkel admitted Germany will miss the carbon emission target set for next year.

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The energy transition is easily affordable but all hope of 1.5C warming will vanish in 2028

Technical consultancy DNV GL has published its Energy Transition Outlook 2019. While the electric vehicle, storage and renewable energy industries are likely to see significant rises in demand, the sobering conclusion is the world will miss carbon reduction targets by a long shot.

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U.K. government announces 2050 carbon neutrality ambition

Leaving with a last hurrah, Brexit casualty prime minister Theresa May has announced a statutory instrument to amend the Climate Change Act of 2008. The law currently prescribes an emissions cut of 80% by 2050, from a 1990 baseline. The new law will aim for net zero emissions by 2050, making the U.K. the first G7 nation to pass such legislation.

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European Parliament elections – the green wave broke far from the shore

Traditional, centrist groupings the social democrats and conservatives lost ground in the weekend’s elections but while green parties gained seats, talk of a green wave washing over the continent appears to have been exaggerated.

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