Web-portal for Germany’s EnergieWende

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It is no surprise that as it leads the world in the transition towards renewable energy, many international observers have questions about the energy path Germany is treading. A new website is providing a wealth of information on the subject, in English, in an attractive portal.

The energytransition.de site was launched late last week and has already gained considerable publicity online. On social media the site already has a strong identity. On twitter @energiewendeGER has over 1,000 followers and is sparking debate around the many issues relevant to Germany’s energy transition.

The site has been launched and funded by the Heinrich Böll Foundation, the political think tank of the German Green Party, and its two lead authors are both based in Germany, the IFEU Institute’s Martin Pehnt, in Heidelberg, and renewable energy journalist and translator Craig Morris, in Freiburg.

"Many international observers ask how Germany plans to proceed without nuclear power," said Arne Jungjohann of the Heinrich Boell Foundation in Washington DC and editor of the website, in a statement announcing its launch. "The website… highlights how Germany successfully provides investment certainty for small businesses and citizens to go renewable."

Lead author Craig Morris highlighted the example set by Germany. "Germans have a will-do attitude. While the U.S. wallows in political gridlock and debates whether renewables might work, the Germans are getting things done by demonstrating that renewables are mature, reliable and much cheaper than expected."

Site administrators have told pv magazine that for 2012, the initial "static" site, "was completely funded by the Heinrich Böll Foundation, but we are interested in finding partners who want to use the platform for a dynamic site – updated continually – in 2013."

The plan for 2013 is for the site to become updated regularly with high quality material on the subject and to further internationalize its reach, with translations of the site into a number of different languages.