China adjusts anti-dumping duties on polysilicon from South Korea

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The Chinese Ministry of Commerce (MOFCOM) announced in a press release it has adjusted the anti-dumping duties on imports of polysilicon from South Korea it imposed in January 2014.

MOFCOM said it has conducted an interim review of the duties upon request of several Chinese polysilicon manufacturers, which was submitted in February 2016.

As a result, the Chinese government has decided to adjust the antidumping duties for Korean producers as follows: OCI Company Ltd. 4.4%; South Korea’s Silicon Industry Co., Ltd. (Hankook SiliconCo., Ltd.) 9.5%; Hanwha Chemical Corporation 8.9%; SMP Ltd. 88.7%; Woongjin Polysilicon Co., Ltd. 113.8%; KCC Corp. and Korean Advanced Materials (KAM Corp.) 113.8%; Innovation Silicon Co., Ltd. 113.8%; and other Korean companies 88.7%.

MOFCOM said its survey has included all the export prices, dumping margins and the normal value of imported solar grade polysilicon originating in South Korea, and has concluded that there was dumping of the investigated product during the investigation period.

China imposed duties on polysilicon imported from South Korea and the United States in July 2013, after launching an investigation into alleged anti-dumping of the raw material by U.S. and South Korean producers in the prior year. At the time, MOFCOM set import duties ranging from 2.4% to 48.7% for Korean producers, while U.S. manufacturers were handed duties ranging from 53.3% to 57%, depending on the dumping margin.

China had spared European polysilicon producers (namely Germany), after Beijing and Berlin reached an agreement on the matter in July 2013.