GreenGo Energy greenlights largest PV project in the Nordics

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Scandinavia’s fledgling solar PV industry received a welcome boon this week with the announcement that clean energy company GreenGo Energy is to commence work on a 6 MW rooftop PV project in Denmark.

In collaboration with Danica Pension – which owns 16 shopping centers in the country – the project’s first phase will deliver 2.4 MW of rooftop PV capacity to four major shopping centers in Denmark, the largest of which is already complete: a single installation of 1.4 MW atop the Kolding Shopping Center. This installation alone is more than double the size of the current largest PV installation in the Nordic region.

The second phase will add a further 3.6 MW atop the roofs of four more shopping centers, of which the 2.2 MW installation planned for the City2 shopping mall in Copenhagen will then become the region’s single biggest array once complete in the summer. A total of eight Danica Pension shopping centers will benefit from this project.

"We are constantly working to optimize return on all of our properties, including through energy retrofit," said Danica Pension’s property director, Peter Mering. "In cooperation with GreenGo Energy, we achieve a solution with good returns and significant energy benefits, to the benefit of our customers and the environment.

"Our green investment represents a significant amount in millions of Danish kroner. PV plants have maximum production of electricity during the day. That is simultaneously also the time when there is most activity in shopping centers and maximum energy consumption, for example for ventilation and cooling. Our goal is to achieve a CO2 reduction of up to 200,000 tonnes by looking at our entire property portfolio.”"

GreenGo Energy will install more than 24,000 panels across a total rooftop area of 39,000 square meters. According to the company, the PV solution does not require any state subsidies and will be entirely for self-consumption.

"The solutions for Danica have been designed so that there is no surplus production to the grid," said GreenGo Energy’s CEO Karsten Nielsen. "All power is consumed where it is produced and that is fundamentally healthy. Thus, it requires no support or subsidies from the state, and likewise there is no income loss on electricity tax and related taxes for the state."

Solar making its mark in Denmark

Elsewhere in Denmark, German-headquartered PV specialist Hanwha Q CELLS announced this week the completion of one of the country’s largest flat roof solar systems – a 354 kW installation atop the Lions Park Birkerod retirement home near Copenhagen.

Hanwha Q CELLS supplied 1,300 monocrystalline Q.PEAK-G3 265 W modules for the array, which will generate 292,000 kWh of clean electricity, enough to power 60 local households for a year, and mitigating the effects of 146 tons of carbon dioxide.

"Subsidies for large PV plants will be reduced bit-by-bit and annually in Denmark," said Jonathan Goose, Hanwha Q CELLS’ sales director for U.K., Ireland and Scandinavia. "Therefore, net metering and self-consumption will become again more attractive for customers."

Cumulative installed PV capacity in Denmark recently topped 200 MW, with the government targeting 800 MW for 2020. However, offshore wind power remains the clear renewable leader in the country, which has some of the lowest levels of solar irradiance in Europe.